New Program Roll Out... taking adventures to new heights

New Program Roll Out... taking adventures to new heights

There is more than one way to use your hammock on your next camping adventure. Join THRYVE in this unique practice that transforms your hammock into restorative yoga playground. Increase your spinal traction for more comfortable sleep and recover your body for longer adventures by learning all the ins and outs of how to fuse yoga and your hammock in a bundle of absolute adventurer bliss.  

5 Elements of Yoga

The Path of the Five Elements

Yoga is a practice that moves from subtle (a thought, feeling or intention) to gross (a movement in the body, or a physical action) and then back to subtle (bliss, freedom, enlightenment). It’s this beautiful dance of cause and effect that inhabits our entire consciousness.

The five elements unfold in a similar way, moving from subtle (space and air) to gross (water, earth).  They are the constituent parts that come together to create our minds, our bodies, our yoga practice and our experience of living.  And they provide a beautiful context for us to expand and enjoy it all.

So to honor our connection with everything around us, and bring us back to ourselves, it’s enlightening to explore each of the five elements in our practice of yoga and life.

1. Space

The container for everything. It is pure possibility and potential.  It feels like stillness, freedom, and awareness.  Space is both a cause and the result of a blissful yoga practice (and life).  It supports and fuels transformation by providing a place for the magic to happen.  Creating space requires discipline, but experiencing it is pure freedom.

Creating space in your yoga is a matter of… Being present and aware of what you’re holding in, up or onto – whether it is a thought, an emotion, or any form of tension — and allowing yourself to let it go.

Yoga Poses: Basket Headstand, Wheel, Camel Pose, Fish Pose

2. Air

Movement, expansion and lightness.  The breath in and out of the body, the opening and contraction of the muscles and the mind.  The element of air gives us rhythm, grace, mobility and a sensation of mental and physical openness.  Air fuels the body and stokes the fire of inspiration.

Infusing air into your yoga comes from… An awareness of the breath.  Pranayama or breath control is a great way to open and tap into the subtle channels of the body — clearing the way for ideas, inspiration, energy and love to flow.  As you move through life and your practice, notice how the breath feeds the body and mind.  Breathe into the expansion and contraction of the muscles, joints, and connective and supportive tissues to create the sensation of lightness and openness.

Yoga Poses: Cat/Cow, Bridge, Bow

3. Fire

Discipline, transformation, inspiration.  The fire in our practice is experienced as intensity and abundance. The heat and energy created is the result of the action, dedication and focus put into the practice.  Ultimately, our fire delivers purification.  It creates insight that allows us to see and engage with what’s important and burn the rest.

Lighting the fire in your yoga is about…Two words: engaging bandhas.  Oh, and three more words: moving from center.  Fire lives in the belly (surprise!) — our center of power, intuition and freedom.  The use of our core muscles connects us to the spark at the center of who we are, and engaging the bandhas helps us keep the fire burning.

Yoga Poses: Plank, Tiger Pose, Revolved Lunge, Chair

4. Water

Fluidity, connection, adaptability.  It shows up in our ability to consciously hold on and at the same time, let go.  It fuels our practice with compassion and resilience that return to us as fluid movement, supple muscles, steady joints, agile minds.

Bringing the water to your yoga means…Cultivating a softness in your practice (particularly in the joints), and nurturing a physical, mental and emotional sensitivity that favors response rather than reaction. It also means moving fluidly through your practice, synchronizing movement with breath, opening, feeling and yielding in a way that is powerful and sustaining. Or, in the immortal words of Bruce Lee “Be[ing] like water.”

Yoga Poses: Pigeon Pose, Striking Cobra, Bound Angle Pose, Frog Pose

5. Earth

Earth is home. It is structure, cohesion, and foundation.  It’s the centered, grounded, and authentic, expression of you and everything around you. Earth is the sensation that we want to return to, the physical stillness that creates mental and emotional stillness, and vice versa.

Cultivating the earth in your practice is about…Establishing your foundation (feet, hands, sit bones).  It’s about maintaining an awareness of how the state and position of these physical landmarks contribute to your overall experience of stability and ease (sthira and sukham).  And remembering that every pose right through to Savasana is an opportunity to return home.

Yoga Poses: Mountain pose, Tree pose, Squat pose, Cobra

Harnessing your "Super Powers" and understanding your alter ego

Harnessing your "Super Powers" and understanding your alter ego

If we inventory our personal "super powers" and start to understand what an alter ego looks like we begin to unlock unlimited potential for growth. Whether you want to change the way you eat or the job you are in, "Harnessing your super hero and understanding your alter ego" will give you steps to start taking action-- no cape required.

Home Workout to Challenge your Power, Grip and Stability

For this workout you will need a Kettlebell or you could use a 1 gallon water bottle or detergent bottle with liquid in it. You will also need a jump rope. 

IMG_2492.JPG

 

Warm-up:

3 Rounds

5 KB Windmills on the Left Side

5 KB Windmills on the Right Side

10 KB Swings

10 KB Goblet Squats

10 KB Offset Push-ups (5x/side)

 

Strength: KB Deck Squat to Overhead Press 3 x 8 reps go as heavy as you can in good form.

Workout: Follow all of Set A with as little rest as possible. Rest 1 min between sets and 2 min between Set A & B and B & C.

A1: 4 x 10 KB Around the Worlds (5x/each direction)

A2:  4 x 10 Alternating KB Floor Press (5x/arm)

A3: 4 x 8 Double KB Front Squat

A4: 4 x 8 each leg Single Leg KB Deadlift

B1: 5 x :30 Jump Rope (Sub jumping jacks if you do not have a rope)

B2: 5 x :30 Alternating KB Swings

B3: 5 x :30 KB Chest Press Flutter Kicks

C1: Jump Rope Sprints 15 x :15 

 

Sedona Yoga Festival Sequences

Sedona Yoga Festival was such an amazing experience and we wanted to make sure that you could continue the experience anywhere in the world. That is why we have attached a the link for two full length 60 min vinyasa classes taught at Sedona Yoga Festival.

Run Free-- Yoga Practice for the Endurance Yogi

 Strengthen and balance your lower body in this 60 minute vinyasa sequence. This class has a nice balance of movement, strength building, core work and flexibility as you wind down with some nice work for your hamstrings and hips. This class is a great off season conditioning practice to use to stay strong. It can also be used as cross training during your season to supplement your speed work or interval run days.

 

Warrior Spirit Sequence

Drawing from a personal experience through cancer, I have developed a practice that invokes each student's inner warrior. Bruce Lee once said that, "what makes a successful warrior is the average man with laser focus." Through this practice students will focus their drishti on breath and movement as a moving meditation. Firing up our centers (core) to march and move as one. This flow will make you sweat, but feel so good. Drawing inspiration from martial arts, calisthenics and dance each student will leave finding new ways to harness their inner warrior on a daily basis.

 

And I also added the Playlist from Run Free because I had so many requests about the music. Enjoy!!

This is a quick reference for the middle sequence of the Warrior Spirit Flow.

 

 

Hand Balancing, Surrender and Confessions of a Teacher

This is my journey. 2017 is the year of surrender and with that I intend to build strength. Those words seem polar to one another-- surrender and strength. But I have found that strength exists on the other side of surrender. 

Let me rewind for a moment. I recall sitting in my yoga medicine teacher training reviewing each asana and the "traditional yoga benefits" tied to each one. The headstand had a laundry list of benefits for the body, "said to be the King of all asanas, develops poise, lightness and stimulates brain, increase brain power, strengthens lungs to resist colds, widens horizons of spirit, one becomes balanced and self-reliant..." and the list continues. Then handstand, "builds strength, patience, confidence and focus." 

Immediately one of the teacher's raised his hand, "Why does the headstand have so many benefits but the handstand which is considerably harder have so little?" Tiffany Cruikshank, Yoga Medicine founder, essentially answered that ego would tell you that handstand is harder, but really practicing it makes you no "better" as a yogi than someone who does not practice it. That did not sit well with the teacher and he seemed more frustrated that the benefits were less. But it made me wonder is it strength that makes handstands harder? 

Arguable from an athletic coach standpoint I recognize the biomechanics of the body and would argue it's not that it is so much harder in terms of strength, but it requires a lot more surrender. Maybe you are scratching your head with that. How does it require more surrender? Well, for one it requires you shed the fear of lacking strength in your shoulder girdle, core, glutes, hamstrings, quads and calves. It also requires you surrender any preconceived notions that you lack the strength or that you are somehow anatomically disadvantaged in one sense of the word or another.

From a yoga student perspective my journey with the handstand made me address inadequacy I saw in myself. In fact, I could tell in a practice how confident I was feeling and how in touch with my body I was based on how I kicked up, jumped up or flipped myself into a handstand. What I learned? I'm inconsistent. I talk to athletes every day about consistency, but when it comes to practicing it myself I get a little ADD and jump around. In fact, that in and of itself told me more about myself and what I was struggling with-- fear of failure. It's easy to jump around from movement to movement and then complain about not getting it. It's a totally different story to stick with it, good, bad or ugly and make noticeable improvements. 

The fear of failure wasn't just an internalized struggle either, it is the working of years in fitness, wellness and yoga. Why? Because as a coach I have heard more times than I care to count that I wasn't fit enough, strong enough, or elite enough to fill a position at a gym or yoga studio. I was told repeatedly I was inadequate. Some events even felt that my lack of "showy movements" just wasn't enough to be "good enough." Talk about feeling inadequate. What if my athletes felt just as slighted that as their coach I wasn't doing straddle handstands off the side of a cliff or winning endurance event after endurance event standing on the podium to prove I am a great coach? Can you believe all of these thoughts came to me in handstands?

The point I am trying to make is that consistency is scary because it means facing failure. It means falling out of the handstand, maybe in the middle class, but it also means sticking the handstand. It means finding body control through mindful acts of movement through meditation. It means sticking with it, until you achieve it. 

As I work on my handstand journey I will share it with you.  Happy Hand Balancing and THRYVE ON.

 

2017 Resolutions, an admission of needing change

The ball has dropped and the New York City streets have cleared faster than Mariah Carey could exit the stage and we are already full swing into our New Years Resolutions. The uncommitted vow to change some aspect of ourselves we feel is less than desirable. We resolve to eat less sugar, drink more water, quit the job that is killing our soul slowly and to finally end bad relationships. 

One week later and we are already doubting our ability to keep eating kale, to drink one more glass of water instead of wine, to dig in and search for the job we are truly after, and to stop making plans with that friend who fails to live up to very meaning of the word. But then we see an "Insta Photo" of some girl's six-pack abs, a guy driving a Ferrari and bragging how he did it by just working from home and suddenly the motivation goes back through the roof.

It would seem that the roller coaster ride that is our desire for change meets an endless road of ups and downs and while some of us learn to put our hands in the air and enjoy the ride, others are puking their brains out and trying to just survive.

So why is it that some can forge ahead in their resolutions, while others are left dizzy and confused by the entire year that flashed before their eyes?

My experience has shown me it's more than will power and determination, it's an actualization that true change needs to happen. For that person it is one step at a time. It's about setting an intention daily that adds up to 365 intentions leading to true change. The intention begins by taking a true self inventory. 

"Rome wasn't built in a day,"  right? Can I get a fact check on that? Because at the rate I see diet pills, fad diets and fitness crazes spill over like water, you would think someone is selling the lie that it can be built in a day. Or even better that you MUST CHANGE to be HAPPY. Is that true? I must change my pant size, my job title or my zip code to somehow become more happy? The answer is no? You need to become more self-aware. What drives you to be happy might include your job or where you live, but it isn't all of who you are or what makes you happy. If we spent 2017 focused on loving ourselves, we would gradually change habits that ultimately look a lot like resolutions. 

What if instead of juice cleanses and making a complete 180 with your nutrition you woke up looked at your day ahead and said how can I fuel my body to get me through the tasks I have on my schedule? Or instead of doing an insane new workout routine you explored a new class that made you want to come back? Why does everything have to be a punishment? If you truly despise the workout you are doing why are you doing? I know I'm asking a lot of questions but it's about time someone did. Food doesn't have to be boring, bland or restrictive to be healthy. You need to find balance. Don't change it overnight. Make gradual changes. 

 

Calisthenics Home Workout

THRYVE DAILY WORKOUT

Warm up: 25 jumping jacks, 20 butt kicks, 15 squats, 10 lunges (5x/leg), 5 sit ups, repeat 2x.

 

Workout: 25 days of Fitness

25 squats

25 sit ups

25 push ups

25 mt. climbers (each leg)

25 leg raises

25 lunges (each leg counts as one)

25 jump squats

25 V-ups

25 side to side jumps

25 squat thrusts

 

Advanced athletes: You will go through this workout 4x and well as make your push ups clapping push-ups, lunges should become jump lunges.

Rock Solid Training

THRYVE DAILY WORKOUT

The workout today is inspired by Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson. So get ready for some Old School Strength.

Warm-up: 3 min jump rope, 25 push-ups, 25 toe touches, 10 pull-ups (or inverted rows), 25 squats

Exercise                                     Warm Up                 Sets             Reps        Rest

 Back Squat                                   2x12                       4                  6-8           120

Bench Press                                   2x12                      4                  6-8            120

Bent Over Barbell Row                 2x12                      4                   6-8            120

Barbell Upright Row                     2x12                      4                   6-8            120

Seated Calf Raise                          2x12                      4                   6-8            120

Floor Crunch                                                              3                     15              30